Reconciliation Queensland is committed to education as an essential element in developing socially just and respectful relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Queenslanders. As reconciliation advocates our members are committed to working with schools, teachers, parents and community members in a variety of local, regional and state focused activities.

What schools do now

In schools across Queensland, reconciliation activities have been creating a new way of developing sustainable partnerships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Queenslanders.

Activities in schools are localised and target students from a variety of ages. Some projects are established through community and school partnerships, whilst others are developed through the initiative of students and teachers. Some include the establishment of memorial gardens and learnscapes, developing collaborative murals and public art, organising events and guest speakers, developing committees or school based reconciliation groups, teachers working on embedding Indigenous perspectives in the curriculum and many other projects.

Some key annual events that you as a reconciliation supporter might support your local school include:

  • National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Day Observance Week (NAIDOC Week)
  • Mabo Day
  • Coming of the Light Celebrations
  • World Indigenous Peoples day
  • Harmony Day

To find out more about these events please go to the Department of Education and Training – Indigenous Portal.

Narragunnawali: Reconciliation in Schools and Early Learning

Reconciliation Australia’s Narragunnawali: Reconciliation in Schools and Early Learning is designed to support all Australian schools and early learning services to develop environments that foster a higher level of knowledge and pride in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and contributions.

Narragunnawali: Reconciliation in Schools and Early Learning

It is expected that schools and early learning services participating in Narragunnawali will achieve:

  • a higher level of understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage
  • a higher level of pride in our shared national identity
  • increased trust between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the wider school community, and
  • reduced prejudice experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and staff.

Narragunnawali (pronounced narra-gunna-wally) is a word from the language of the Ngunnawal people meaning peace, alive, wellbeing and coming together. The Ngunnawal people are Traditional Owners and Custodians of the land and waterways on which Reconciliation Australia’s Canberra office is located.

Narragunnawali News is a newsletter for schools with useful and interesting information about reconciliation in Australia, ideas for driving reconciliation in schools and early learning services, and highlights of the great things happening in schools and early learning services across the country.

Student and teachers are encouraged to submit stories about the fantastic things happening in schools and early learning services to increase pride in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures! Please send stories about reconciliation in schools or early learning services to: schools@reconciliation.org.au.